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Bristol Bears change eight for visit of Northampton Saints

Siale Piutau will captain Bristol. (Photo by Harry Trump/Getty Images)

Bristol Bears have made eight changes to the side that earned a bonus point win victory over Worcester at Sixways as they go in search of back-to-back Gallagher Premiership wins when Northampton Saints visit in round 19 (KO 7.45pm).

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Director of Rugby Pat Lam has brought Piers O’Conor and Alapati Leiua into the back three, while Andy Uren is also selected in the backline.

Siale Piutau is handed the captaincy for the Ashton Gate clash and is selected to start, subject to the outcome of Monday’s online independent disciplinary panel.

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In the pack, Jake Woolmore and Harry Thacker are named in the front row, while Dave Attwood and Joe Joyce come into the second row. Chris Vui switches to blindside flanker, while Ben Earl returns to the starting line-up.

Chris Cook is listed among the replacements and could make his Bristol Bears debut if called upon.

15. Charles Piutau; 14. Piers O’Conor, 13. Semi Radradra, 12. Siale Piutau (c), 11. Alapati Leiua; 10. Callum Sheedy, 9. Andy Uren; 1. Jake Woolmore, 2. Harry Thacker, 3. Kyle Sinckler, 4. Dave Attwood, 5. Joe Joyce, 6. Chris Vui, 7. Ben Earl, 8. Nathan Hughes.

System players: 16. Will Capon, 17. Yann Thomas, 18. Peter McCabe, 19. Steven Luatua, 20. Dan Thomas, 21. Chris Cook, 22. Max Malins, 23. Luke Morahan.

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Unavailable: Jake Armstrong (ankle), Max Lahiff (concussion), John Afoa (concussion), Harry Randall (knee laceration), Sam Bedlow (shoulder), Toby Fricker (groin).
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