Relegated Yorkshire Carnegie have changed their name for a fifth time as they head to National League 1 and the third flight of English rugby.

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The RFU confirmed that the curtailed Championship table positions would effectively stand, meaning Yorkshire were relegated, while at the other end of the table Newcastle Falcons were promoted.

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It has been confirmed that Yorkshire Carnegie will now revert to their previous name: Leeds. They previously went by the following: Headingley, Leeds RUFC, Leeds Tykes and Leeds Carnegie.

Speaking on the club website, Director of Rugby Phil Davies said: “Unfortunately, relegation was inevitable given the results we had suffered this season but I do think it is a shame for the lads who gave so much this season that they have not had the chance to finish off the campaign.

“I can only talk about since the turn of the year but I have seen how much hard work these lads have put in on a part-time basis and there were shoots of recovery coming; it would have been great for them to get a win but obviously events for all of us have taken an unprecedented turn.

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“This is an end of one era that has seen the club rise to the top two divisions, win a Cup at Twickenham, play amongst the elite in Europe, produce numerous internationals as well as offering countless chances for local players to play professional Rugby Union but it is time now for a new era. Playing in National One next season offers us an opportunity to rebuild the club, reset our culture and principles and set the values we want to instil.

“We want to re-engage with the universities in our city, the general public and business’ in Leeds and find a new way to forge for the people of Leeds a Rugby Union club they can be proud of again,” he added.”

Yorkshire Carnegie didn’t win a game all season and earned just two losing bonus points. Their points difference for the season ended up at minus 528, an average losing margin of over 37 points a game.

“National Division One is an extremely tough competition with experienced and well run teams throughout it. We have to match that and lay our own markers to build a better future together,” added Davies.

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