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BREAKING: World Rugby are stepping in on the Samoa crisis

World Rugby has increased its funding in Pacific Islands teams after the Samoa Rugby Union (SRU) was declared bankrupt.

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Samoan prime minister Tuilaepa Lupesoliai Sailele Malielegaoi, the SRU chairman, issued a fundraising plea to the public to try to keep the insolvent governing body going on Wednesday.

It was announced by the world governing body on Thursday that Samoa, Tonga and Fiji will receive a 19 per cent rise in investment in co-operation with Pacific Rugby Players.

World Rugby stated that additional funds would be handed out to assist with high-performance programmes of the three unions and their Rugby World Cup 2019 campaigns.

Peter Horne, the World Rugby general manager, high performance, said: “In the 2016-19 cycle, World Rugby will invest an estimated £20.3million in programmes for Fiji, Tonga and Samoa which is an increase of 19 per cent on the last cycle.

“This programme is reaping benefits with the outstanding performances of the Flying Fijians this year as well as the World Rugby-funded Fijian Drua, competing in Australia’s National Rugby Championship as a pathway for local players.

“Tonga’s win against Italy last November was a big push towards their Rugby World Cup 2019 qualification and we’d love to see similar results from them and Samoa this November.

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“As we work towards RWC 2019, we need to ensure the three Pacific Island teams are as competitive as possible and this increase in world-class staffing and support will really benefit the squads.”

Samoa face Scotland at Murrayfield on Saturday and take on England at Twickenham in a fortnight.

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William 1 hours ago
All Blacks vs England takeaways: Richie Who? Time for Cortez

Correct analysis of Perofeta’s bungling of the try opportunity Ben. Never ‘fixed’ Steward as he came across in defence and passed too early. Steward didn’t have to break his stride and simply moved on to pressure Telea. Never scanned the easier option of passing to the two supporting players on the inside. Beauden Barrett showed how it is done when he put Telea in for his try. Another point from the game is that the rush defence is hard to maintain as the number of phases increases. From scrums the defensive line only contains backs who all have roughly the same pace. Once forwards are involved, the defence has players with variable speeds often leading to a jagged line. It also tends to lose pace overall giving the attack more time and space. Beauden Barrett’s break to set up Telea’s try came because Baxter went in to tackle McKenzie and Steward went out to cover Telea. Barrett has a massive hole to run through, then commits Steward by passing as late as possible and Telea scores untouched. Another comment I would make is that Ben Earl is a good player and generally an excellent defender but he made three significant misses in the series, two of which led to All Black tries. Got stepped by Perofeta in Dunedin for Savea’s try, missed McKenzie in Auckland leading to what should have been a certain try being set up by Perofeta and was one of the tacklers who couldn’t stop Savea in the leadup to Telea’s first try. Perhaps he should contact Owen Farrell to pick up a few tips from ‘tackle school’.

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