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Some of the best grassroots rugby photos you will ever see...

By Liam Heagney
Spirit of rugby category winner - The calm before the storm at Ampthill (Photo by Daniele Colucciello)

With the Twickenham World Rugby Museum currently playing host to a wonderful exhibition showcasing the excellent work of the first Rugby Journal photographer of the year finalists, a call has now gone out from the publishers of the quality UK coffee-table style magazine for entries in this year’s Keith Prowse-sponsored competition.

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The magazine’s inaugural competition saw more than 500 photographers enter from 24 different countries competing for their work to feature in the exhibition at the home of English rugby and a £1,000 first prize.

That prize was eventually awarded to Italian photographer Daniele Colucciello for an image taken inside the Ampthill dressing room portraying the calm before the storm of a match.

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The picture was judged the overall best picture from the six categories:
1. Young photographer (open to anyone aged 16 and under);
2. Portrait (an image of any individual involved in a game);
3. Action (a photograph that brings to life the split-second moments that embody the sport);
4. Spirit (an image from beyond the 80 minutes that reflects the spirit of the game);
5. Landscape (a picture that is as much about the setting as the game itself);
6. Portrait (a collection of up to ten images from different matches in the same season reflecting a body of work).

Entries in this latest competition must be taken between January 1, 2021, and March 31, 2022, and they can be submitted via the Rugby Journal website (click here to enter). Category winners will be revealed online before the overall winner is announced at the awards evening at the World Rugby Museum in Twickenham in May.

Alex Mead, the Rugby Journal editor-in-chief, said: “Rugby photographer of the year with Keith Prowse is a competition that celebrates the very best of rugby photography, both amateur and professional from across the globe, culminating in an exhibition at the World Rugby Museum at Twickenham.

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“The work of our first rugby photographer of the year finalists has been viewed by thousands of people at Twickenham’s World Rugby Museum. Every shortlisted entry from all categories, chosen by our panel of expert judges from the worlds of rugby and photography, will appear.

“In addition, readers will also get their say with the action category winner chosen by public vote. The overall winner will be announced at a special event hosted at the World Rugby Museum in May.

“All shortlisted entries will have their work featured in an exhibition at the World Rugby Museum inside Twickenham Stadium. Category winners will be revealed online before the overall winner is announced at the awards evening at the World Rugby Museum in Twickenham.”

Rugby Journal awards 1
Young category winner – RC Locomotive vs RC Sokol-Stupino, Moscow (Photo by Arina Chistyakova)
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Rugby Journal winner 2
Portrait category winner – Orla from Thamesians Ladies (Photo by Lara Miller)
Rugby Journal winner 3
Action category winner – Coventry vs Fylde (Photo by James Cannon)
Rugby Journal winner 5
Landscape category winner – Cowpie Classic rugby tournament (Photo by Susi Baxter-Seitz)
Rugby Journal winner 6
Portfolio category winner (Photo by Camila Leon-Quijana)
The current exhibition on display at the Twickenham World Rugby Museum

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