Springbok flyhalf Handre Pollard has offered a critical assessment of himself after a few missed kicks ended up costing his side Montpellier in Paris against Racing 92.

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The World Cup-winning 10 hasn’t been able to play for his new club since fracturing his eye socket during the World Cup final. He was held back from Champions Cup action last weekend against Toulouse, allowing for a Parisian debut in La Defense Arena.

The goal-kicking pivot missed two penalties and a conversion in his side’s 29-25 defeat.

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“I’m always disappointed whenever I miss a kick, there were a couple of tough ones in there. I expect from myself to kick those over,” he said post-match.

“It’s something I pride myself on, it’s not good enough but I’m positive going forward.”

Pollard offered 13 running metres on six carries and set up one try on attack while Scotland’s flyhalf Finn Russell set up both his side’s two tries. The difference between the two sides was goal kicking, with Racing 92 kicking at 100% compared to Montpellier’s 57%.

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Montpellier’s set-piece also struggled, only winning half of their lineouts and conceding a tighthead feed.

Prior to his Top 14 debut, Pollard said the most important thing for him now is winning a title with Montpellier with the World Cup firmly in the rear-view mirror.

“For an international player, it’s always a goal to win a title for his country, especially a World Cup,” he told Rugbyrama.

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“When I started with the Springboks, that was my goal. Now it is a thing of the past. It’s a memory that will stay with me for life and also gives me confidence because we have been successful at the highest level. Now the most important thing for me is the future and winning a title with Montpellier.

He said he doesn’t care for personal accolades but noted that he will have to adapt to the new environment in the south of France. With former Springbok teammates Jan Serfontain and Bismark Du Plessis also on the roster, the former Blue Bulls flyhalf will have some familiarities.

“The most important thing for me is not my personal case but the team. I repeat: I want to try to win trophies. I’m going to give my best and for that, I have to immerse myself in another culture. It’s up to me to adapt.”

David Wallace on what it means to play for the British & Irish Lions:

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