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How the Wallabies’ ‘classic’ 2023 RWC jersey can ‘inspire’ every Australian

By Finn Morton
(Photo: Brendan Hertel/RugbyAU Media)

For the first time at a Rugby World Cup since 1995, the Wallabies will return to their “classic” gold strip at this year’s event in France.

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The Wallabies unrelieved their 2023 Rugby World Cup jersey on Thursday alongside apparel partner ASICS.

As well as wearing “classic Wallaby gold” at the World Cup, Australia have also included a permanent First Nations component into their primary jersey design for the first time at the sports showpiece event.

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The design of Kamilaroi/Gamilaraay artist Dennis Golding have been included on the inside of the collar and in the playing numbers.

“A jersey is something that can really unite a nation and for me the 2023 Rugby World Cup is an instant classic,” Wallaby and ASICS Ambassador Andrew Kellaway said in a statement.

“ASICS put a lot of time and effort working with the players to make these jerseys ideal for performance which will be key for the team in France later this year.

“It’s also really special for the players to be wearing the classic Wallaby gold at a World Cup again and I’m sure we’ll see plenty of supporters wearing gold in the stands as well.”

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According to Rugby Australia’s statement, the jersey has been designed to “give the Wallabies every performance advantage” at this year’s World Cup.

The jersey is made from recycled polyester and “features a new ergonomic neckline for flexibility and durability.”

Australia will also take a white jersey to this year’s Rugby World Cup, and that kit will also feature designs from Dennis Golding.

“ASICS has worked in close partnership with the Wallabies in creating a special Wallaby RWC jersey that represents all Australians,” incoming Rugby Australia CEO Phil Waugh said.

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“The Wallabies jersey is the traditional ‘Wallabies gold’ in colour and includes special design features representing our proud First Nations culture on the inside of the collar and in the numbers on the players’ backs.

“This is (a) Wallaby jersey that we think will inspire great pride and confidence in the players when they put it on.

“We hope it generates the same pride in the fans that will be watching the cheering them on in France later this year.”

The Wallabies will usher in a new era under coach Eddie Jones when they take on the Springboks in South Africa next month.

Australia will also play Argentina in Sydney and two Tests against the All Blacks before travelling to Europe ahead of the Rugby World Cup.

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2 Comments
O
ORSON 388 days ago

"The Wallabies 'unrelieved'their 2023 Rugby World Cup jersey." Unrelieved?, surely you mean unravelled. Even grammerly is available to the wider public.

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Shaylen 6 hours ago
Ireland and South Africa share the same player development dilemma

These guys will be utility players Nick it cannot be helped because coaches cannot help themselves. Rassie looks at players like these and sees the ability to cover multiple positions without losing much. It allows the 6-2 or 7-1. He wont change his coaching style or strategy for one player. At provincial level players like these are indispensable. If there is an injury to your starting 12 but your back up 12 is a bit iffy then a coach is going to go with the back up 10 who is gold and who can play a good 12. Damian Willemse for the Springboks is an obvious case, for the Stormers its the same. Dobson plays him at 12 or 15, with Gelant in the team he plays 12 but if Gelant goes down he doesnt go for his back up 15, he just puts Willemse there. With Frawley its the same at international and provincial level. He just slots in wherever. Frans Steyn made a career out of it. He was much maligned though as a youngster as he never fully developed into any role. He then went to Japan and France to decide for himself what kind of player he was, put on muscle and retained his big boot, ran over players and booted the ball long and came back into the Springboks after about 3 years away and was then certain about how he wanted to play the game no matter what position. Coaches cannot help themselves because they only want what is best for their teams and that means putting your most talented players on even if it means you cause them some discomfort. Sometimes players need to decide how they want to play the game and then adapt that to every position and let the coach decide how they want to use them.

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