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The 5 Laws World Rugby will pass into use as of July 1st

By Ian Cameron
PA

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World Rugby have confirmed that they have voted to introduce five recent trial Laws into full use across the sport as of July 1st.

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The trial laws had been tested for the previous year in professional rugby and include the 50:22 and the goal line dropout, which have proven popular with fans of the sport.

The other ‘welfare driven’ laws include a ban on pre-bound pods of players under pre-existing ‘flying wedge’ laws, the sanctioning of the lower-limb clearout and a ban on latching.

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The lower limb clearout law now rules: ‘A player may lever the jackler out of the contest at the ruck but must not drop their weight onto them or target the lower limbs.’

A World Rugby statement reads: “With rugby united in its mission to be the most progressive sport on player welfare, the package of five laws have all been approved with welfare advancement in mind and following a global trial period of one year where every player at all levels has been able to play under them and have their say.”

Another trial law – the scrum brake foot – will be trialled globally, including both upcoming Rugby World Cups in New Zealand and France.

“The scrum brake foot, trialed in this years’ Six Nations Championships, will move from a closed to global trial, meaning it will also feature at the men’s and women’s Rugby World Cups in 2022 and 2023.

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“World Rugby’s Laws Review Group and High Performance Rugby Committee made the recommendations to the World Rugby Council following detailed analysis of welfare and shape of the game data as well as feedback from the Game, including players, coaches, match officials, medics and public.”

World Rugby Chairman Sir Bill Beaumont said: “Rugby’s laws are fundamental to its accessibility, appeal and safety. It is our mission to ensure that the laws are the best that they can be for everyone playing the game and the approval of these laws following detailed evaluation and widespread consultation, underscores that commitment.

“I would like to thank every player, coach and medic at every level for participating and providing feedback on this trial – your views are important to us and we will continue to consult with you as we work together to cement rugby as the most progressive sport on player welfare.”

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World Rugby Chief Player Welfare and Rugby Services Officer Mark Harrington said that the organisation would not stand still on making the game safer.

“We never stand still when it comes to welfare and in addition to this important work, we are near completion of a ground-breaking study into the frequency and nature of head impacts in community and elite rugby in partnership with the University of Otago and University of Ulster, undertaking further women-specific research and validation of the contact training guidance published last year. All of these priority strands will inform the decisions we make to advance welfare for players at all levels of the game.”

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