Select Edition

Northern Northern
Southern Southern
Global Global
NZ NZ

Whistleblowers: New documentary to shine light on life of a referee

By Josh Raisey
Whistleblowers

A groundbreaking documentary providing an unprecedented insight into the lives of referees at the Rugby World Cup last year is set to be released next month.

ADVERTISEMENT

Whistleblowers, produced by World Rugby Studios, is due to be released on February 1 on RugbyPass TV, and for the first time will give an exclusive account of what it was like to be a part of the officiating team at the global showcase in France, following referees and their families, and highlighting the emotional highs and lows that come with the job.

“Through this compelling film we hope that a new level of respect and empathy is built towards match officials around the world,” World Rugby CEO Alan Gilpin said, and Whistleblowers delivers on this aim, brining never-seen-before footage of the training and preparation elite referees go through, alongside in-depth interviews and reactions to some of the most crucial moments of the tournament.

Video Spacer

WHISTLEBLOWERS – Now available on RugbyPass.tv | RPTV

Watch World Rugby’s newly released Whistleblowers – a ground-breaking film following the world’s top match officials at Rugby World Cup 2023 in France, only on RugbyPass TV

Watch now

Video Spacer

WHISTLEBLOWERS – Now available on RugbyPass.tv | RPTV

Watch World Rugby’s newly released Whistleblowers – a ground-breaking film following the world’s top match officials at Rugby World Cup 2023 in France, only on RugbyPass TV

Watch now

While the focus is chiefly on the players during a World Cup, the film provides a “new perspective” and shows the great similarity between the lives of referees and players during the eight weeks- the comradery of the team, their pursuit to improve as the World Cup progresses and the drive to officiate in the final, with only one being given the whistle for the tournament’s climax.

But the documentary also sheds light on the darker side of the ‘toughest job in sport’. From a career-ending injury suffered by Jaco Peyper in the quarter-finals to the abuse experienced by Wayne Barnes in the wake of the tournament, Chief Marketing and Content Officer at World Rugby James Rothwell perfectly described Whistleblowers as “compelling and difficult viewing at times”.

In a tournament that was not shy of major refereeing calls, including the first ever World Cup final red card, Whistleblowers exposes viewers to the subsequent slew of online abuse that often came after the each final whistle was blown, and a behind-the-scenes insight into the impact that this growing affliction on rugby has on referees and their families.

“We want to lift the lid for fans on what we are living every day, a hugely rewarding job with the best seats in the house for some of the biggest encounters in sport,” said Peyper ahead of the documentary’s launch.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Some call it the toughest job in sport, and there are huge highs and lows, but the experiences, the friendship and the places are a privilege also. Hopefully viewers will understand that we are normal human beings with families, trying to be the best we can be, and give them a better understanding of the environment that we operate in and our dedication to the sport we love.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Join free

LIVE

{{item.title}}

Trending on RugbyPass

Comments

1 Comment
B
Bob Marler 169 days ago

Hope they show the parts where brown envelopes are exchanged at WCs. Or I’m not watching.

🙄

Join free and tell us what you really think!

Sign up for free
ADVERTISEMENT

Latest Features

Comments on RugbyPass

FEATURE
FEATURE How can Rassie Erasmus evolve his deadly Bomb Squad? How can Rassie Erasmus evolve his deadly Bomb Squad?
Search