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Springbok branded 'worst transfer in Irish rugby history'

By Ian Cameron
Jean Kleyn, left, RG Snyman and Marco van Staden of South Africa during the national anthems before the national anthems before the 2023 Rugby World Cup Pool B match between South Africa and Ireland at Stade de France in Paris, France. (Photo By Brendan Moran/Sportsfile via Getty Images)

Springbok second row RG Snyman has been branded the ‘worst transfer in Irish rugby history’ after he once again missed out on a crucial Munster match.

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Despite initially been named to start, Snyman failed to recover from an unspecified bug which had been doing the rounds at Munster and ultimately played no part in their 24-14 defeat to Northampton Saints in the Investec Champions Cup Round of 16 at Franklin’s Gardens yesterday.

Munster have found themselves once again ejected from the competition which has become sown into the very fabric of the province since they lifted it back in 2006 and 2008 after years of knocking at the door.

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Ultan Dillane and Donnacha Ryan review Stade Rochelais’ win over the Stormers

Former Irish forward Ultan Dillane and compatriot Donnacha Ryan review Stade Rochelais’ win over the Stormers and a rematch with Leinster.

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Ultan Dillane and Donnacha Ryan review Stade Rochelais’ win over the Stormers

Former Irish forward Ultan Dillane and compatriot Donnacha Ryan review Stade Rochelais’ win over the Stormers and a rematch with Leinster.

Snyman’s absence once again will have been a bitter pill for fans to swallow. Undoubtedly one of the most formidable players in the world when fit, Snyman’s tenure at Munster has been marred by repeated injuries that have massively curtailed his time on the field – almost to comedic levels.

Over the course of four seasons, Snyman has managed only seven appearances for the club, a stark contrast to the expectations fans had upon the arrival of the World Cup winner. If reports of his salary at to be believed, his pay rate works out at a staggering €285,714  per game over four seasons. If you break it down further in minutes played, he’s been paid €4,629 per second on the pitch.

His contributions in the Champions Cup have been minimal, with just one appearance, and he is still yet to start a game at Thomond Park or alongside Tadhg Beirne in the engine room.

Despite these setbacks at the club level, Snyman has made eleven appearances for the South African national team in the same timeframe, highlighting an increasingly awkward disparity between his Test and club-level contributions. As fate would have it, his fitness came good in time for the Boks’ 2023 Rugby World Cup campaign.

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Rugby journalist Michael Cantillon asked the question on X recently: ” “[Snyman] Has to be the worst transfer in Irish rugby history?”

The South African lock is set to transition to Leinster next season and Leo Cullen will be hoping that his string of miserable luck will come to an end.  Leinster will lose the service of fellow Bok Jason Jenkins, who came good after signing for the Blues after injuries also limited his time with Munster.

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Leinster will be hoping it will be a similar story with Snyman.

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D
Diarmid 10 hours ago
Players and referees must cut out worrying trend in rugby – Andy Goode

The guy had just beasted himself in a scrum and the blood hadn't yet returned to his head when he was pushed into a team mate. He took his weight off his left foot precisely at the moment he was shoved and dropped to the floor when seemingly trying to avoid stepping on Hyron Andrews’ foot. I don't think he was trying to milk a penalty, I think he was knackered but still switched on enough to avoid planting 120kgs on the dorsum of his second row’s foot. To effectively “police” such incidents with a (noble) view to eradicating play acting in rugby, yet more video would need to be reviewed in real time, which is not in the interest of the game as a sporting spectacle. I would far rather see Farrell penalised for interfering with the refereeing of the game. Perhaps he was right to be frustrated, he was much closer to the action than the only camera angle I've seen, however his vocal objection to Rodd’s falling over doesn't legitimately fall into the captain's role as the mouthpiece of his team - he should have kept his frustration to himself, that's one of the pillars of rugby union. I appreciate that he was within his rights to communicate with the referee as captain but he didn't do this, he moaned and attempted to sway the decision by directing his complaint to the player rather than the ref. Rugby needs to look closely at the message it wants to send to young players and amateur grassroots rugby. The best way to do this would be to apply the laws as they are written and edit them where the written laws no longer apply. If this means deleting laws such as ‘the put in to the scrum must be straight”, so be it. Likewise, if it is no longer necessary to respect the referee’s decision without questioning it or pre-emptively attempting to sway it (including by diving or by shouting and gesticulating) then this behaviour should be embraced (and commercialised). Otherwise any reference to respecting the referee should be deleted from the laws. You have to start somewhere to maintain the values of rugby and the best place to start would be giving a penalty and a warning against the offending player, followed by a yellow card the next time. People like Farrell would rapidly learn to keep quiet and let their skills do the talking.

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