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Luther Burrell begins training with Warrington Wolves

By Josh Raisey
Luther Burrell

After his career in union and with Northampton Saints ended under two weeks ago, many would have thought that Luther Burrell would take a break ahead of his move to rugby league with Warrington Wolves.

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The Saints have just finished an extraordinarily long season, reaching the semi-finals of both the Premiership and the European Challenge Cup. Additionally, Chris Boyd’s side won the Premiership Rugby Cup, meaning Burrell would have played a lot of rugby this season.

However, it looks like the former England international is already in training with the Wolves. This was revealed through his new teammate Josh Charnley’s Instagram, showing the 31-year-old in his new Warrington training kit.

View this post on Instagram

It's Luther.

A post shared by Joshua Charnley (@joshuacharnley) on

Charnley, like Burrell, made the move to Warrington with great success last season from rugby union’s Sale Sharks. However, Charnley had already made his name in league with Wigan at the beginning of the decade, but he will nonetheless understand what Burrell will be facing by switching codes.

Warrington currently sit second in the Super League table, and are to face Hull FC in the Challenge Cup semi-final, meaning their season could go on until early October should they make the Super League Grand Final. That would bring to a conclusion a season that has been well over 13 months for Burrell, which would be a Herculean effort.

Then again, Burrell has expressed his excitement at this move, and with Warrington performing so well currently, his debut could not come soon enough for him.

Having played for the Huddersfield Giants as a teenager, the game of league will not be completely new to Burrell, meaning his transition could be swift and successful. At over 17 stone, the 15-cap England international’s power makes him dangerous in either code, and his running game will be a real asset to the Wolves.

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Although many thought he would take some time out before his league career starts, Burrell could be playing sooner than expected.

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finn 9 hours ago
Massive red flag raised by weakened Champions Cup teams – Andy Goode

I wonder if the problem of some teams not taking it that seriously would be helped by making performance in the champions cup count towards qualification and/or seeding in the following year’s competition. Eg. top four seeds would be winners of the URC, premiership, and top 14, plus best performing team in the previous year’s CC who have not otherwise qualified. Doing that the seedings for this years comp. would have been: Tier one: Saracens - Munster - Toulouse - la Rochelle Tier two: Sale - Stormers - Racing 92 - Leinster Tier three: Leicester - Connacht - Bordeaux - Exeter Tier four: Northampton - Ulster - Lyon - Sharks Tier five: Harlequins - Glasgow - Stade Francais - Edinburgh Tier six: Bath - Bulls - Toulon - Ospreys The competition would probably work better with fewer teams, so I’d probably favour only the first 4 tiers being invited, and then going straight to a quarter final without a round of 16. On the one hand this would possibly incentivise teams to take the champions cup seriously, and on the other it would mean that the latter stages would be more likely to involve teams that have demonstrated a willingness to take the competition seriously. The main differences between my proposed system and the actual draw is that mine would give la Rochelle a fairly easy ride to the quarters, and would either exclude the Bulls entirely or would give then an insurmountably difficult draw. As it happened Exeter got quite an easy pool draw but that was a bit of a fluke. My system would reward Exeter for being one of the teams that demonstrably devote a lot of attention to the CC by guaranteeing them a good draw.

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