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Fraser McReight wants Wallabies 'bucket list' moment with Harry Wilson

By AAP
(Photo by Anthony Au-Yeung/Getty Images)

Fraser McReight wants to wear a gold jersey alongside good mate Harry Wilson and hopes he’ll follow his lead after committing to Australian rugby.

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The Queensland Reds openside flanker has signed a two-year extension that will keep him on the books beyond this year’s World Cup and through to the 2025 British and Irish Lions’ tour of Australia.

The 24-year-old captained the Australian U20 side at the 2019 world championships.

But he has been limited to 10 Test caps thanks to the resilience and class of former Wallabies captain and fellow No.7 Michael Hooper.

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McReight has been patient though and says he didn’t seriously consider a big-money move to Europe or Japan.

“There wasn’t too much of a thought; some clubs were interested but this was the best place for me,” he said.

“It was relatively easy. Home’s here, love the Reds and want to play for Australia. It’s great to have that locked away and focus on footy.”

Backrow partner Wilson is the Reds and Wallabies’ next target, the No.8 a ferocious ball runner with slick hands that has impressed new Australia coach Eddie Jones in Super Rugby Pacific’s opening month.

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Like McReight he’s battling for a regular Wallabies spot and was contracted until the end of this season and an attractive prospect abroad.

“I want him stay; he’s one of my close mates and love playing for him but he’s got to look out for himself,” McReight said of Wilson.

“We’ve played together since we were 12. It’s a cool thing as you develop, see how they thrive and go about it.

“Hopefully we can do that more and we haven’t played with each other in the gold jersey yet, so that’s something we want to tick off the bucket list.”

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Regarded as Hooper’s Wallabies heir apparent, McReight said his discussions with Jones had been positive.

“I’ve spoken to Eddie yep, it’s going to be great for Australian rugby,” he said.

“He’s going to let you know what you need to work on but (in terms of the pecking order) I’m not worried about that at all.

“We’ve played three games so far … I’ll keep ripping in.”

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Flankly 2 hours ago
Resilient Irish will test Springboks despite provincial setbacks

The Bok kryptonite is complacency. How did they lose to Japan in 2015, or to Italy in 2016? There are plenty of less dramatic examples. They often boil down to the Boks dialing back their focus and intensity, presuming they can win with less than 100% commitment. This can be true of most teams, but there is a reason that the Boks are prone to it. It boils down to the Bok game plan being predicated on intensity. The game plan works because of the relentless and suffocating pressure that they apply. They don’t allow the opponent to control the game, and they pounce on any mistake. It works fantastically, but it is extremely demanding on the Bok players to pull it off. And the problem is that it stops working if you execute at anything less than full throttle. Complacency kills the Boks because it can lead to them playing at 97% and getting embarrassed. So the Bulls/Leinster result is dangerous. It’s exactly what is needed to introduce that hint of over-confidence. Rassie needs to remind the team of the RWC pool game, and of the fact that Ireland have won 8 of the 12 games between the teams in the last 20 years. And of course the Leinster result also means that Ireland have a point to prove. Comments like “a club team beating a test team” will be pasted on the changing room walls. They will be out to prove that the result of the RWC game truly reflects the pecking order between the teams. The Boks can win these games, but, as always, they need to avoid the kryptonite.

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